Glues

We’ve reviewed a number of different glues and thought it would be good to look at them based on what you could glue to what…

Cardboard to Cardboard

Most glues are capable of bonding 2 pieces of cardboard together and so it is more then a matter of application and thickness of the cardboard – the thickness will effect the weight and so the forces that the joint will need to hold. For cardboard models where you will be forming 3 dimensional joints and you will have a tendency to put quite high forces onto the joints as you pull the model into shape then a good glue is a PVA (eg Evo-Stik qood glue) or an Aliphatic (eg Titebond). The glue stick is not really suitable as it has a tendency to go brittle and lose strength over time.

 

Leather to Metal

Here the problem is leather is flexible and absorbent and metal inflexible and impervious.

  • Impact Adhesive – An impact adhesive is a good choice. As always ensure the surfaces are clean and grease free. Then apply the adhesive to each surface and allow to dry (as per the instructions). The two parts may then be put together and pressure applied to ensure a good connection. Allow to set as per the instructions.

 

Leather to Wood

Both are porous surfaces.

  • Aliphatic – An aliphatic or pva glue works well in this situation. The aliphatic will be stronger, but the downside is it will be less flexible than PVA.
  • Impact Adhesive – If you want a really flexible joint and the area to be joined is reasonably large then an impact adhesive works well.

 

Metal to Metal

The problem is that both surfaces are inflexible and impervious. Any temperature change will result in expansion or contraction of the metal parts and this most likely will be different to the glue resulting is stress in the joint and possible failure.

  • Epoxy Resin – there are a number of two part epoxy resins available, normally in tubes, that once mixed thoroughly give you a working time of between 5 minutes and 2 hours.
  • Gorilla Glue – This is an amazing glue and is able to bond metal to metal.
  • Instant Adhesive – Instant glue will form a bond between the two surfaces if they are both clean, free from grease and if the metal will not get too hot. Above 100°C most instant glues start to break down and fail.

 

Paper to Paper

Most glues are capable of bonding 2 pieces of paper together and so it is more then a matter of application.

 

 

 

 

Rubber to Metal

You have a number of choices assuming the metal is inflexible.

  • Gorilla Glue – clean the surfaces, slightly rough them and use a small amount of water. The small amount of moisture will help the glue foam up and set.
  • Impact Adhesive – Evo Stik is one of the best manufacturers of this. Clean the surfaces, slightly rough up the surface, apply the adhesive to both surfaces and allow to dry before putting them together. Note that this will form a bond and you will not be able to move the parts, so you will need to be sure of where the parts are being placed.

Rubber to Wood

You have a number of choices assuming the metal is inflexible.

  • Gorilla Glue – clean the surfaces, slightly rough them and use a small amount of water. The small amount of moisture will help the glue foam up and set, personally I would make the wood slightly damp in this case.
  • Impact Adhesive – Evo Stik is one of the best manufacturers of this. Clean the surfaces, slightly rough up the surface, apply the adhesive to both surfaces and allow to dry before putting them together. Note that this will form a bond and you will not be able to move the parts, so you will need to be sure of where the parts are being placed.

 

Wood to Wood

PVA – a common PVA such as Evo-Stik PVA wood glue works fine with most wood. This is the glue that you can buy in most DIY shops.  This is a good general purpose wood glue that is also great for craft and hobby work.

This also works well with papier-mâché projects, just water it down first.

Aliphatic Resin – There are a number of aliphatic resins that are superior wood glues, advantages include: tack time of around 30 minutes, fast set, stronger than wood, heat and solvent-resistance.

A significant benefit with aliphatic resins is the excellent sandability and the fact that they are unaffected by finishes. We’ve reviewed Titebond and Titebond II – two of the go to glues in my workshop.